reset

whatwhiteswillneverknow:

Remember, in order to find good accounts of police work, you’ll have to dig underneath a lot of dead bodies, false accusations, and innocents locked up in prison. 

And then, you’ll have to avoid all the dirt you dug up with a straight face.


156 notes

blackfemalepresident:

msstealyouroppa:

unamericanflag:

my aesthetic: a potted cactus on a skateboard, always moving, no one knows where it came from or where it’s going

do any of us really know where we came from, or where we’re going?

time to log off jaida


84,289 notes
z0rr:

my pup still thinks he’s a pup, when i try to put him down he refuses 
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z0rr:

my pup still thinks he’s a pup, when i try to put him down he refuses 


12,590 notes
goddesswithinyou:

"We had a lot of trouble with western mental health workers who came here immediately after the genocide and we had to ask some of them to leave.They came and their practice did not involve being outside in the sun where you begin to feel better. There was no music or drumming to get your blood flowing again. There was no sense that everyone had taken the day off so that the entire community could come together to try to lift you up and bring you back to joy. There was no acknowledgement of the depression as something invasive and external that could actually be cast out again.Instead they would take people one at a time into these dingy little rooms and have them sit around for an hour or so and talk about bad things that had happened to them. We had to ask them to leave.”~A Rwandan talking to a western writer, Andrew Solomon, about his experience with western mental health and depression. From The Moth podcast, ‘Notes on an Exorcism’.
(Courtesy: Spiritual Ecology)
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goddesswithinyou:

"We had a lot of trouble with western mental health workers who came here immediately after the genocide and we had to ask some of them to leave.

They came and their practice did not involve being outside in the sun where you begin to feel better. There was no music or drumming to get your blood flowing again. There was no sense that everyone had taken the day off so that the entire community could come together to try to lift you up and bring you back to joy. There was no acknowledgement of the depression as something invasive and external that could actually be cast out again.

Instead they would take people one at a time into these dingy little rooms and have them sit around for an hour or so and talk about bad things that had happened to them. We had to ask them to leave.”

~A Rwandan talking to a western writer, Andrew Solomon, about his experience with western mental health and depression. 

From The Moth podcast, ‘Notes on an Exorcism’.

(Courtesy: Spiritual Ecology)


1,082 notes
emilianadarling:

IF YOU THINK FOR ONE SECOND THAT SLAPPING A HALLOWEEN WRAPPER ON SOMETHING IS GOING TO MAKE ME WANT IT MORE THEN YOU ARE absolutely correct i’ll take 50. 
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emilianadarling:

IF YOU THINK FOR ONE SECOND THAT SLAPPING A HALLOWEEN WRAPPER ON SOMETHING IS GOING TO MAKE ME WANT IT MORE THEN YOU ARE absolutely correct i’ll take 50. 


44,604 notes
rare-insights:

tellmethatyouneed-me:

werelivinganightmare:

vanillafaces:

The story behind it (again): This is a picture of my arm and my sister’s. She’s the one with the tattoo I’m the one with the scars. I’ve been in a mental hospital for over a year because of selfharm, suicidal thoughts & a depression. Me and my sister always had a really close band. We only had each other but everything changed when I was hospitalised; she was alone and she couldn’t cope with the fact that I was unhappy. She kept blaming herself and tried everything to make me better. She always had to cry when I needed to go back to the hospital. She cried while calling ambulances for me and when she saw my not responding on the bathroom floor. But things got better, because of the hospital but because of her too. I had a reason to live, to exist. I realised I needed to get better because of her. She always told me it was me & her against the world. And believe me we were and we still are. So when I got better I still had all those marks on my arm, it made me sad ofcourse it reminded me of my lows and my demons. My sister saw how it affected my recovery and without I knew any of it she tattooed my birthday on her wrist. I kept asking her why why why. Her answer: ‘You don’t have your own arms anymore so you can have mine’ This picture shows how she pulls me up every time.

oh my god. this is beautiful

‘You don’t have your own arms anymore so you can have mine’

♡☪♡
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rare-insights:

tellmethatyouneed-me:

werelivinganightmare:

vanillafaces:

The story behind it (again): This is a picture of my arm and my sister’s. She’s the one with the tattoo I’m the one with the scars. I’ve been in a mental hospital for over a year because of selfharm, suicidal thoughts & a depression. Me and my sister always had a really close band. We only had each other but everything changed when I was hospitalised; she was alone and she couldn’t cope with the fact that I was unhappy. She kept blaming herself and tried everything to make me better. She always had to cry when I needed to go back to the hospital. She cried while calling ambulances for me and when she saw my not responding on the bathroom floor. But things got better, because of the hospital but because of her too. I had a reason to live, to exist. I realised I needed to get better because of her. She always told me it was me & her against the world. And believe me we were and we still are. So when I got better I still had all those marks on my arm, it made me sad ofcourse it reminded me of my lows and my demons. My sister saw how it affected my recovery and without I knew any of it she tattooed my birthday on her wrist. I kept asking her why why why. Her answer: ‘You don’t have your own arms anymore so you can have mine’ This picture shows how she pulls me up every time.

oh my god. this is beautiful

‘You don’t have your own arms anymore so you can have mine’

♡☪♡


97,754 notes
kaliforniia-kueen:

midnight-sun-rising:


You know there are programs that can change your daughters confused predilections.

My heart fucking broke during this scene. 

This was my favourite scene. He’s a military man who comes off as a typical “manly man” and he stands up for his daughter being lesbian. This scene was heartbreaking but fucking beautiful.
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kaliforniia-kueen:

midnight-sun-rising:

You know there are programs that can change your daughters confused predilections.

My heart fucking broke during this scene. 

This was my favourite scene. He’s a military man who comes off as a typical “manly man” and he stands up for his daughter being lesbian. This scene was heartbreaking but fucking beautiful.


92,467 notes

say-zar:

ruinedchildhood:

biggest plot twist in all of history

*patiently waits 34787894745 years for sequel*


670,701 notes
Just the little things that get me through my day. Welcome to my life, streaming live from the strugglebus <3